SteamPunk Magazine 04, różne przeróżne, steampunk

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our lives as fantastic as any fiction!
Lifestyle, Mad Science,
Theory & Fiction
]
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Steampunk Magazine Issue #1 -
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4
STEAMPunk Magazine
One thing I have faithfully observed and noted about
punks: they’re all legends, each and every last one of
them, in one circle or another. Even if you never see them
in the elements of their renown, even in a mere courtesy-
handshake between friends of friends in a parking lot,
you cannot help but feel an immortal vibrancy, a comic-
book kind of costumed exuberance like that parking lot
is host to a historic summit or a scene in ten thousand
movies we’re living right now...
Inevitably I reach the understanding that this word
‘punk’ does not mean anything tangible like ‘tree’ or ‘car.’
Rather,
punk
is like a lag; an open symbol, it only means
what people believe it means.
—Michael Muhammad Knight,
he Taqwacores
he cover was illustrated by Claire Hummel
SteamPunk Magazine Issue #4 -
 our lives as fantastic as any fiction!
Welcome back, fellow time-travelers, artists, vagrants, engineers,
pirates, bookworms, performers, and other such folk! For that
is who we are—we are all wearers of multiple hats (see Molly
Friedrich’s article on how to create your own! ;). Issue Four of
SteamPunk Magazine is a tribute to the multiplicity of our
culture. Steampunk is fantasy made real, iltered through the
brass sieve of nostalgia, vehemence, curiosity, wonderment, and
apprehension.
Our culture is not based only in story—it’s about action.
Contrary to what we often see on blogs and in forums, steampunk
is inherently political. Daring to wear what we want and creating
communities in our image is rebellious. Popular or no, steampunk
is not commonplace. It is anti-establishment. It is dangerous to
pluck our dreams from muddy scribblings and coax them into
existence in three dimensions.
Let us not speak only of ages gone by, of retrofutures and
fantasy worlds. Let us talk about change in our time. Let us talk
about going to protests or shows in our garb and performing on
the street to let people know we exist and passing out free food
and literature to anyone who might hunger. Let us talk of the
environmental impact of mainstream culture’s technofetishism
and of civil rights. Let us talk about doing great and wondrous
things, not just what other people are doing elsewhere. And
then let us do. Let us make real what we hallucinate on paper or
online.
Sometimes, in our giddiness to participate in community,
we forget that steampunk
does
exist outside of our laptops and
personal computers. We waste our nights furiously bantering
over theory and semantics when we could be gathering together
to create. Not everyone is a maker, but we can certainly be more
conscientious consumers. Steampunk is in our cofeehouses and
alleys and parks, thriving just as wildly as it might in any internet
forum. We must remember that our stories may be told online,
but we must take our ideas of the computer screen and into the
streets.
Steampunk Magazine would, however, like to ofer our
readers a chance to gather together in the ether to formulate our
futures perfect. Understanding a need for a mechanism that allows
friends across continents to share projects and philosophies, we
are proud to announce the opening of he Gaslamp Bazaar, which
is located at
. We
hope that such a place will encourage activism amongst our ranks
and solidify us as a society. Please stop on by! We would love to
see what you have been doing.

Libby Bullof
issue four:
Contents
Narratives
A Fabulous Junkyard .................................................................16
by David X. Wiggin
Doppler and the Madness Engine (Part One of hree) ......30
by John Reppion
he Duel.......................................................................................48
by Nicholas Cowley
Antonio’s Answer .......................................................................58
by the Catastraphone Orchestra
An Unfortunate Engagement (Part Four)..............................68
by G.D. Falksen
Interviews
Donna Lynch & Steve Archer ..................................................26
a pair of remarkable creators
Ann & Jef VanderMeer ............................................................40
power couple of speculative iction
Features
Letters............................................................................................. 4
For Freedom .................................................................................. 6
being the remarkable life of one Isabelle Eberhardt
Build Yourself A Jacob’s Ladder...............................................10
mad science for the sake of mad science
An Unexpected Hat ...................................................................22
an introduction to DIY millinery
Green Fairies, Witch-Cradles, and Angel Tongues .............36
victorian approaches to altered states
Paint it Brass................................................................................46
the intersection of goth and steam
Brass Monkeying ........................................................................54
how to turn copper into brass
Hire Our / About Our Contributors ......................................76
Publishing Schedule, Submissions, Etc..................................78
he Future....................................................................................80
SteamPunk Magazine Issue #4 -
write us at collective@steampunkmagazine.com
too devoted to your various projects
to become a full-time propmaker, and
Doc, you are hopefully using this as a
springboard to pursuing your dreams
on the west coast. I am happy for your
success and hope you wring as much
from the buzz as you can. he media,
after all, is trying to wring what they can
from you.
So this is what bothers me:
Steampunk is not some non-functional
ray-gun to be painted and polished
and put on a shelf, it is a revolution in
personal behavior and industrial design!
It means making an
actual
ray-gun! Or,
barring that, a ray-gun case for your
TV remote... for are not these objects
merely props in a larger lifestyle? If we
are making our computers look old-
fashioned, isn’t it just so they match the
rest of our house? Isn’t someone who
collects skateboard decks and hangs
them on the wall a
fan
of skateboarding,
rather than a skater?
I know already that both of you feel
the same way about Steampunk. You’ve
both worked hard to emphasize that the
product is not the point. We are all three,
after all, merely at the right place and
time. None of us can make anything that
cannot be churned out en masse by some
factory full of third-world craftsmen, were
some investor to see the proit in it and
start importing “von Slott” keyboards.
We have what the cool-hunters want,
an understanding of a nascent trend.
After all, the beauty of our projects is
that a determined-enough individual
could make them by themselves. Ideally
each Steampunk craftsman would be
supported by the idle rich who don’t
wish to bother with the efort, or, in trade
between steampunk costume-makers,
case-modders, engineers, etc etc. Perhaps
we’re witnessing the early stages of the
Neo-Victorianism as described in
he
Diamond Age
, where mass production
has leeched the value from everything
that is not handcrafted. Still, I have a
friend who is a maker of very ine, very
expensive, and very labour-intensive
wooden clamps which he sells to Home
Depot; he has recently lost that client
to someone who is making the same
product with slave labor in China.
And now I will tell two stories:
I have long been struggling with
the balance of technophobia and
technophilia in Steampunk. I like to say
that Steampunks are far from Luddites,
but appear so, where in fact we are
obsessed with technology but we are
“techno-suspicious”. I was discussing
this suspicion with Guru Stu, trying
to pin its speciics down, and he told
me a story: After Hoot Gibson’s NASA
astronaut career was over, he became
the CEO and head test pilot for Benson
Space Company, a ledgling private-
rocketeering irm. As the company
An open letter to Jake von Slatt and
Datamancer
Gentlemen,
A hearty congratulations on the
attentions paid to you by the press of late.
Fear no “selling out”, for all such trends
wax and wane, with only the true devotees
remaining (witness the continued
perpetuation of metalhead culture long
after society has considered metal to be
dead). Attention from the mainstream
will draw more good people (who will
linger long after the trendseekers move
on) just as well as it will manufacture a
cheesy, store-bought version of your
trend available to all who wish to buy-in
without efort. So now you may play a
skateboarding video game if you are too
lazy to actually skateboard, and so on.
Yet something disturbs me about
this coverage, and I assure you it’s not
your fault at all. he media seems to
portray steampunk as a trend in prop-
making and case-modding. heir
reasoning is obvious; this is the most
marketable aspect of it and larger
society understands nothing that
cannot be bought or sold. Of course
this has beneitted you in the short
term and I think neither of you wish
to become wholesale manufacturers of
keyboards. Let’s treat it as a fortunate
happenstance—for Jake, you seem all
comic by Doctor Geof
4 - Letters
letters
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