Studies in Language and Linguistics Selected Readings for Students of English Philology, angielski i stuff

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Studies
in
Language and Linguistics
Selected Readings
for
Students
of
English Philology
editors
Piotr Cap
and
Magdalena
Kozanecka
Contents
Foreword
5
(Piotr Cap and Magdalena Kozanecka)
CHAPTER ONE
English sentence:
syntax-semanticsinterface
Analysis of a simple sentence
9
(Szymon Pedziwiatr)
Analysis of a complex sentence
27
(Piotr Cap)
PART
ONE
PART
TWO
CHAPTER TWO
Language in action: pragmatic
and social aspects of language use
The pragmatics of interpersonal communication
39
(Piotr Cap)
Analysis ofcultural texts
57
(Magdalena Nowacka)
PART
ONE
PART
TWO
CHAPTER THREE
Methods of teaching English
as a foreign language
Selected aspects of classroom discourse and their impact
on language development in the torelgn language context
69
(MirosCaw Pawlak)
CHAPTER FOUR
Introduction to translation theory
111
(Magdalena Kozanecka)
CHAPTER FIVE
Introduction to Cognitive Grammar
(Kamila Turewicz)
PART
ONE
Cognitive Grammar:
the nature of language and meaning
171
Cognitive Grammar:
semantic structure ofgrammatical categories
185
PART
TWO
Foreword
The present volume contains contributions by the staff of the English Department at
the Academy of Humanities and Economics (AHE) in todi. The aim of the volume is to
present students, in a clear and consistent form, with reading material as used during most
of the undergraduate and graduate courses in English language and linguistics at the AHE.
However, the addressees of the material are also students of English at other higher-educa-
tion institutions, both state and private, such as teacher training colleges or translation and
interpreting centers.
The material has been selected and arranged according to the teaching curricula fol-
lowed by most philological departments in Poland. Chapters
1-111
deal with issues which
students are faced with during the first three years of academic instruction,and chapters
IV-V
tackle topics which students encounter later, e.g. during
M.A.
seminars. For that reason, the
consecutive chapters and chapter parts can be characterized as getting increasingly more
difficult and specialized.
Chapter One provides students with material concerning English syntax and semantics.
The first part of the chapter deals with the syntax of the simple sentence, while the second
discusses the structure of the complex sentence. Both parts can be successfully used during,
for instance, descriptive grammar courses, esp. in the first two years of instruction.
Chapter Two positions selected observations from chapter one, in interpersonal and
intercultural contexts of 'real-life' discourse. In the first part, the discussion is centered
around concepts of linguistic pragmatics. Among traditional topics, students are offered
a look at how language can be used to accomplish concrete goals in face-to-face persuasion.
In the second part, students are familiarized with broader, sociolinguistic issues which con-
cern relationship between language and culture. The second part of chapter two also brings
up some notions which have to do with English language teaching, and thus provides a feasible
introduction to the next chapter.
Chapter Three contains an in-depth overview of English teaching methods and strate-
gies; it also discusses the development of English teaching over years. This material is of
a special importance to those students who, in their careers, intend to become teachers of
English, whether on a classroom or tutorial basis.
Chapter Four is a more difficult and specialized contribution, dealing with the many
domains of translation and translation theory. Included in the discussion are such concepts
as
translatability, equivalence,
and
evaluation,
as well as a number of the most typical trans-
lation strategies at the word, phrase and sentence level. This material should, in principle, be
used by students attending graduate seminars in translation and translation theory.
Chapter Five is again devoted to complex, specialized issues which are normally under-
taken not sooner than during M.A. research. The chapter describes and evaluates a relatively
novel development in linguistics, which has come to be termed as Cognitive Grammar. The
discussion tackles the profound questions of the nature of language and cognition, and the
relationship holding between them. 'This relationship is shown to determine the structure of
particular grammatical categories in a language, of which English is an example.
The authors wish to extend multiple thanks to all those who submitted their contribu-
tions to the volume. Also, we owe a debt of gratitude to Professor Kamila Turewicz, the Pro-
Rector in Charge of Development of the
AHE,
for her continuous support underlying the
project. We are equally indebted to Professor Piotr Stalmaszczyk from the University of
tbdz, for reviewing the text. Finally, words of thanks go to Dr Monika Gregorowicz-Cap
for editorial help.
Piotr Cap, Magdalena Kozanecka
tbdi, August 2002
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